Constituent Assemblies (Comparative Constitutional Law and Policy)

Constituent Assemblies (Comparative Constitutional Law and Policy)
Comparative constitutional law has a long pedigree, but the comparative study of constitution-making has emerged and taken form only in the last quarter-century. While much of the initial impetus came from the study of the American and French constituent assemblies in the late eighteenth century, this volume exemplifies the large comparative scope of current research. The contributors discuss constituent assemblies in South East Asia, North Africa and the Middle East, Latin America, and in Nordic countries. Among the new insights they provide is a better understanding of how constituent assemblies may fail, either by not producing a document at all or by adopting a constitution that fails to serve as a neutral framework for ordinary politics. In a theoretical afterword, Jon Elster, an inspirational thinker on the current topic, offers an analysis of the micro-foundations of constitution-making, with special emphasis on the role of crises-generated passions.
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Constituent Assemblies (Comparative Constitutional Law and Policy)

Constituent Assemblies (Comparative Constitutional Law and Policy)
Comparative constitutional law has a long pedigree, but the comparative study of constitution-making has emerged and taken form only in the last quarter-century. While much of the initial impetus came from the study of the American and French constituent assemblies in the late eighteenth century, this volume exemplifies the large comparative scope of current research. The contributors discuss constituent assemblies in South East Asia, North Africa and the Middle East, Latin America, and in Nordic countries. Among the new insights they provide is a better understanding of how constituent assemblies may fail, either by not producing a document at all or by adopting a constitution that fails to serve as a neutral framework for ordinary politics. In a theoretical afterword, Jon Elster, an inspirational thinker on the current topic, offers an analysis of the micro-foundations of constitution-making, with special emphasis on the role of crises-generated passions.
Buy the book Constituent Assemblies (Comparative Constitutional Law and Policy) from Ideakart.com.

India @ 70, Modi @ 3.5: Capturing India’s Transformation Under Narendra Modi


Transformation of a nation—that too, with the size and complexity of India—won’t happen in months. At the same time, if it took decades, it won’t be called transformation any more. So is India really in the middle of a transformation under the Modi government? Are we seeing history in the making without fully realising it?
The best way to answer these questions would be to capture the story of India’s development since 2014 with the backdrop of its progress as an independent nation. This book brings together acclaimed economists, scholars, diplomats and strategicians who dispassionately analyse India’s growth story under the Modi Sarkar. Be it plugging massive public spending leaks through the astute cashless transaction stratagem or touching the lives of millions of women through Ujjwala—the cooking gas revolution; be it the campaign to clean India, creating 100 smart cities or the focus on renewable energy and making India a responsible global leader, what stands out in the analysis is that the Prime Minister leads from the front, retains a grip on the performance parameters with processes like Pragati and believes in people participation—an inherent ingredient of the Reform, Perform and Transform theme that is close to his heart.
This deeply analytical and evocative book captures the incremental changes combined with a sense of inherent hope and optimism that India is witnessing today—an essential reading to understand the working of the Modi government and the nation’s unique growth story under it.
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An Era of Darkness: The British Empire in India

An Era of Darkness: The British Empire in India
In 1930, the American historian and philosopher Will Durant wrote that Britain’s ‘consciousand deliberate bleeding of India… [was the] greatest crime in all history’. He was not theonly one to denounce the rapacity and cruelty of British rule, and his assessment was notexaggerated. Almost thirty-five million Indians died because of acts of commission andomission by the British—in famines, epidemics, communal riots and wholesale slaughterlike the reprisal killings after the 1857 War of Independence and the Amritsar massacreof 1919. Besides the deaths of Indians, British rule impoverished India in a manner thatbeggars belief. When the East India Company took control of the country, in the chaos thatensued after the collapse of the Mughal empire, India’s share of world GDP was 23 percent. When the British left it was just above 3 per cent.The British empire in India began with the East India Company, incorporated in 1600, byroyal charter of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth I, to trade in silk, spices and other profitableIndian commodities. Within a century and a half, the Company had become a power toreckon with in India. In 1757, under the command of Robert Clive, Company forces defeatedthe ruling Nawab Siraj-ud-Daula of Bengal at Plassey, through a combination of superiorartillery and even more superior chicanery. A few years later, the young and weakenedMughal emperor, Shah Alam II, was browbeaten into issuing an edict that replaced hisown revenue officials with the Company’s representatives. Over the next several decades,the East India Company, backed by the British government, extended its control over mostof India, ruling with a combination of extortion, double-dealing, and outright corruptionbacked by violence and superior force. This state of affairs continued until 1857, whenlarge numbers of the Company’s Indian soldiers spearheaded the first major rebellionagainst colonial rule. After the rebels were defeated, the British Crown took over powerand ruled the country ostensibly more benignly until 1947, when India won independence.In this explosive book, bestselling author Shashi Tharoor reveals with acuity, impeccableresearch, and trademark wit, just how disastrous British rule was for India. Besidesexamining the many ways in which the colonizers exploited India, ranging from the drainof national resources to Britain, the destruction of the Indian textile, steel-making andshipping industries, and the negative transformation of agriculture, he demolishes thearguments of Western and Indian apologists for Empire on the supposed benefits ofBritish rule, including democracy and political freedom, the rule of law, and the railways.The few unarguable benefits—the English language, tea, and cricket—were never actuallyintended for the benefit of the colonized but introduced to serve the interests of thecolonizers. Brilliantly narrated and passionately argued, An Era of Darkness will serve tocorrect many misconceptions about one of the most contested periods of Indian history.
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Good Governance: Never on India’s Radar


Powerful and incisive, Good Governance – Never on Indias Radar offers an insightful look into the problems plaguing Indian politics today. India is clearly divided into two worlds – the much touted ‘shining India’ signifying the glossy, superficial, highly westernized sections of society with their extravagant lifestyles and the ‘left-behind India’ or Bharat, which consists of the poor, deprived, malnourished, under-fed, neglected and marginalized sections of society, residing largely in rural areas and in slums and hutments in urban areas. There is an ever widening gap between these two Indias. In this concise yet wide-ranging book, Madhav Godbole delves into what he considers the root of Indias socio-political problems-the lack of good governance, which, he asserts, has never been a focus of governments in our country. Godbole traces the rise and fall of politics and policy in independent India from the time of Jawaharlal Nehrus Prime Ministership to present day through a careful exploration of several issues-from defining the concept of good governance as understood universally, to identifying the highly problematic areas of governance that need urgent action and emphasizing how changes in polices can make a marked difference to governance in our country.
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